Published On: Fri, Mar 1st, 2013

Djibouti: the saga continues after disputed parliamentary elections

The aftermath of the allegedly rigged parliamentary elections, which took place last Friday, 21 February 2013, have encountered unprecedented public response that go unabated.

The Union for the Presidential Majority (UMP) declared victory saying to have won 49 seats out of the possible 65 National Assembly seats, which is rejected by USN, the united front of the opposition.

Following three days of unrest and arrests of senior Imams the situation seems to get out control and there appears to be no sight of stability.

Mr Abdouraham Boreh, an influential businessman and a member of the opposition who fell out with Djibouti authority and was forced into exile said: “I am disappointed and deeply concerned about the wellbeing of the politicians and senior Imams who have been arrested, beaten and tortured”. Mr Boreh advice the Djibouti government to release these respected moderate Imams with immediate effect

“Freedom loving Djiboutian’s have demonstrated courage and a great willingness to observe peace and stability. For the first time we witness votes being counted till the early hours of the following day, which is great testament of the peoples’ willingness for change”.

Further, Mr Boreh advices the authorities including the police and the military to restrain and abstain from using force to silence the peace people of Djibouti. Change is inevitable and after 36 years of one party rule it is time the Mr Ismail Omar Guelle goes”.

Finally, Mr Boreh encourages peace-loving Djiboutian to join the Djibouti National Demonstration Day, which will take place Friday, 1 March after Salaatul Jumah.

http://youtu.be/-7lV41m6k5U

 

By Justice for Djibouti

  • Hanad

    Does this mean that the count down of the days for Omer Geullle has started. Vote manifpulation is the cutlure of uses leaders like Siilaanyo.

  • PuntlandGeezer (PIS)

    Isaaq should take example from the useless ciise who completely abandoned the somali language, somali heritage and somali culture and even deny being of somali origin just to obey their french colonists masters so I urge my fellow Isaaq brothers/sisters to reject the Ethiopian stooge (SNM) who have barricaded themselves inside morgan toilet.

    • jamac

      We issaqs educated and teached you daroods every thing you know. yOU DAROODS ARE NOTHING BUT FEW DOGS WHO HAVE BEEN TRAINED BY THEIR MASTERS. The ciise have more guts then daroods and mooryans put together.

      • DHUXUL

        CIISA are not somalis, infact most somalis see them SAME as AFAR ppl, they a lot in common.kkkkkkkkkkkk, CIISE DAD QAL,kkkkkkkkkkk

    • kaboon

      please just tell me why daroods are so jealous of everyone else. Just make me understand what fuels such jealousy.

    • hornid

      Lol ur are so crasy Pirate boy. I do not still understand how we shared same country during 30 y. Once fully independent Somaliland Has to pass urgently law which ban zoomalian populated by pirates,terrorist,faqash,walanweyn ,moryan and Bantu for entrance for at least 10y time needeed to become more civilized.kkk

  • tellmetruth

    Kudos to the people of Djibouti and I just hope it don't turn violent and ugly, because we all know the tendencies of dictators.

    • Sahra

      Tellmetruth I'm with you they should do it peacefully, but I can see why people are sick and tired of this lousy dictator. Do you know the kind of money they make no one should be starving in that tiny nation. instead the condition of average joe is pretty bad and isn't getting any time soon better. Because of this brutal dictator and his bad policy which only is to enrich himself and his love ones at expenses of the greater population. the only advice I have for you is don't burn your country do it wisely.

  • Jabuutawi

    These pirates with ill-gotten goods find us interesting than their dusty villages of Garawe and Bosasso.

More in Africa (187 of 1151 articles)
djibouti protest